samedi 13 août 2016

Japan leads the world in Innovation

Japan has been hailed the most innovative country in the world, with 40 of the nation’s companies listed in a global index of the top innovating businesses.
The 2015 Thomson Reuters Top 100 Global Innovators listed Canon, Fujitsu, Mitsubishi Electric, Panasonic and Toshiba among the most innovative Japanese businesses.

1.Japan (40)

2.USA (35)
3.France (10)
4.Germany (4)
5.Korea (3)
5.Switzerland (3)
7.Canada (1)
7.Belgium (1)
7.Netherlands (1)
7.Sweden (1)
7.Taiwan (1)

lundi 8 août 2016

Japan and US lead in patent filings in 3D printing, nanotechnology & robotics

Japan and the United States lead a small group of nations that are driving innovation in 3D printing, nanotechnology and robotics, three frontier technologies that hold the potential to boost future economic growth, a new WIPO (1) report shows.

3D printing, robotics, and nanotechnology were selected as the focus for the WIPO report in 2015 because of their rapidly growing potential and their significance as “frontier technologies”. These three areas of technological innovation have been significant within many industries, and the United Nations believe they have the potential to advance and provoke growth within the slowly moving global economy.

the report shows that Japan, the U.S., Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the Republic of Korea accounted for 75 percent or more of all-time patent filings in the areas of 3D printing, nanotechnology and robotics.

Japanese companies are leading innovation in the area of robotics. Eight out of the top ten patent applicants in the area of robotics are from Japan – namely, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Denso, Hitachi, Panasonic, Yaskawa, and Sony. The two others are Bosch, from Germany, and Samsung of the Republic of Korea.

While U.S. entities file collectively for most nanotechnology patents, Samsung is the top filer and six of the top ten filers are from Japan – Nippon Steel, Toshiba, Canon, Hitachi, Panasonic and TDK. IBM, the University of California, and Hewlett Packard of the U.S. complete the top ten list.

U.S. entities also file for most 3D printing patents, with 3D Systems and Stratasys as the top two applicants and General Electric and United Technologies among the top ten. Three German companies – Siemens, MTU Aero Engines and EOS – as well as three Japanese companies – Mitsubishi, Hitachi, and Toshiba – complete the 3D printing top ten list.

(1) WIPO (The World Intellectual Property Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations

dimanche 7 août 2016

Hideo Kodama is the “father” of 3D printing

In 1981, Backed by his interest and knowledge of 3D computer-aided design, Hideo Kodama came up with an idea to realize three-dimensional (3D) printing and wrote it down However, his idea was too far ahead of its time in the 1980s when even 2D printers were expensive and his idea was ignored at least in Japan. Mr. Kodama should be considered the father of 3D printing technology.

The 3D printer has come into practical use more than ten years after the Kodama’s first report. However, we have seen a remarkable progress in 3D printing technology in recent years. The technology has attracted much attention for its high potential to innovate the core manufacturing technologies in home electronics and automobile manufacturing industries as well as in other field such as medical and design industries.

Recently, the method of modeling has diversified and the modeling can be fabricated from a wide variety of materials, such as plastic and metal, which have all helped to expand the application of 3D printers, and the 3D printing industry is expected to grow to a 20-billion-dollar industry. The 3D printing technology is called the Industrial Revolution of the 21st Century.

Top Inventors of all Time (Inventions That Changed the World)

Leonardo Da Vinci (1452 – 1519)

One of the greatest ever minds, invented models that proved workable to Nowadays. He was an Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography.
He has been variously called the father of paleontology, ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter and tank, he epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal.
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Isaac Newton (1642 – 1727)

was an English physicist and mathematician (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time and a key figure in the scientific revolution.
His book Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica ("Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy"), first published in 1687, laid the foundations for classical mechanics. Newton made seminal contributions to optics, and he shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz for the development of calculus.
Newton's Principia formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation, which dominated scientists' view of the physical universe for the next three centuries.
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Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

was an Italian astronomer, physicist, engineer, philosopher, and mathematician who Developed a powerful telescope and confirmed revolutionary theories about the nature of the world and played a major role in the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century.
He has been called the "father of observational astronomy", the "father of modern physics", and the "father of science". His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the discovery of the four largest satellites of Jupiter , and the observation and analysis of sunspots. Galileo also worked in applied science and technology, inventing an improved military compass and other instruments.
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Michael Faraday (1791 – 1867)

Faraday was an English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. His main discoveries include the principles underlying electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis.
Although Faraday received little formal education, he was one of the most influential scientists in history.
His inventions of electromagnetic rotary devices formed the foundation of electric motor technology, and it was largely due to his efforts that electricity became practical for use in technology.
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Guglielmo Marconi (1874 – 1937)

Guglielmo Marconi, 1st Marquis of Marconi was an Italian inventor and electrical engineer known for his pioneering work on long-distance radio transmission and for his development of Marconi's law and a radio telegraph system. He is often credited as the inventor of radio, and he shared the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics with Karl Ferdinand Braun "in recognition of their contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy".
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Archimedes (287 – 212 BC)

Archimedes of Syracuse, was an Ancient Greek polymath, mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer Amongst other things Archimedes defining an accurate approximation of Pi and developed the Archimedes screw for lifting up water from mines or wells.
Generally considered the greatest mathematician of antiquity and one of the greatest of all time, Archimedes anticipated modern calculus and analysis by applying concepts of infinitesimals and the method of exhaustion to derive and rigorously prove a range of geometrical theorems, including the area of a circle, the surface area and volume of a sphere, and the area under a parabola.
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Alessandro Volta (1745 – 1827)

Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta was an Italian physicist, chemist, and a pioneer of electricity and power, who is credited as the inventor of the electrical battery and the discoverer of methane.
He invented the Voltaic pile in 1799, With this invention Volta proved that electricity could be generated chemically and debased the prevalent theory that electricity was generated solely by living beings. Volta's invention sparked a great amount of scientific excitement and led others to conduct similar experiments which eventually led to the development of the field of electrochemistry.
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Thomas Edison (1847 – 1931)

He developed and innovated a wide range of products from the electric light bulb to the phonograph and motion picture camera.
He also combined a rare inventor’s capacity to make them commercially viable. he made a fortune through the electric light bulb and other inventions such as the phonograph.
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Alexander Graham Bell (1847 – 1922)

He was a Scottish-born scientist, inventor, engineer and innovator who is credited with patenting the first the first practical telephone.
Many other inventions marked Bell's later life, including groundbreaking work in optical telecommunications, hydrofoils and aeronautics.
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George Westinghouse (1846 – 1914)

George Westinghouse, Jr. was an American entrepreneur and engineer who invented the railway air brake and was a pioneer of the electrical industry, gaining his first patent at the age of 22. Based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for much of his career, Westinghouse was one of Thomas Edison's main rivals in the early implementation of the American electricity system. Westinghouse's electricity distribution system, based on alternating current, ultimately prevailed over Edison's insistence on direct current. In 1911 Westinghouse received the AIEE's Edison Medal "For meritorious achievement in connection with the development of the alternating current system."
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Nikola Tesla (1856 –1943)

Serbian born scientist who emigrated to the US. he is known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.
Tesla went on to pursue his ideas of wireless lighting and electricity distribution in his high-voltage, high-frequency power experiments and made early (1893) pronouncements on the possibility of wireless communication with his devices.
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Benjamin Franklin (1705 – 1790)

was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a renowned Polymath who discovered electricity and invented the Franklin stove.
As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions.
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James Watt (1736 – 1819)

was a Scottish inventor, mechanical engineer, and chemist whose Watt steam engine,, an improvement of the Newcomen steam engine, which was critical in the industrial revolution. His invention of a separate condensing chamber, greatly improved the efficiency of steam.
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The Wright Brothers

Orville and Wilbur Wright, were two American brothers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane.
The brothers' fundamental breakthrough was their invention of three-axis control, which enabled the pilot to steer the aircraft effectively and to maintain its equilibrium.
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George Stephenson (1781 – 1848)

Stephenson was an English civil engineer and mechanical engineer who built the first public inter-city railway line in the world to use steam locomotives, the Liverpool and Manchester Railway which opened in 1830.
Renowned as the "Father of Railways", the Victorians considered him a great example of diligent application and thirst for improvement, with self-help advocate Samuel Smiles particularly praising his achievements. His rail gauge of 4 feet 8 1⁄2 inches (1,435 mm), sometimes called "Stephenson gauge", is the standard gauge by name and by convention for most of the world's railways.
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Oliver Evans (1755 – 1819)

Oliver Evans was an American inventor, engineer and businessman. A pioneer in the fields of automation, materials handling and steam power, Evans was one of the most prolific and influential inventors in the early years of the United States. He left behind a long series of accomplishments, most notably designing and building the first fully automated industrial process; America's first high-pressure steam engine; and the first (albeit crude) amphibious vehicle and American automobile.
Evans designed a continuous process of manufacturing that required no human labor. This novel concept would prove critical to the Industrial Revolution and the development of mass production. He was the first to describe vapor-compression refrigeration and propose a design for the first refrigerator in 1805.
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Richard Trevithick (1771 – 1833)

He was a British inventor and mining engineer from Cornwall, England. Born in the mining heartland of Cornwall, Trevithick was immersed in mining and engineering from an early age. he performed poorly in school, but went on to be an early pioneer of steam-powered road and rail transport.
His most significant contribution was the development of the first high-pressure steam engine. He also built the first full-scale working railway steam locomotive. On 21 February 1804 the world's first locomotive-hauled railway journey took place as Trevithick's unnamed steam locomotive hauled a train along the tramway of the Penydarren Ironworks, in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales.
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James Clerk Maxwell (1831 – 1879)

Maxwell was a Scottish scientist in the field of mathematical physics. His most notable achievement was to formulate the classical theory of electromagnetic radiation, bringing together for the first time electricity, magnetism, and light as manifestations of the same phenomenon. Maxwell's equations for electromagnetism have been called the "second great unification in physics" after the first one realised by Isaac Newton.
His discoveries helped usher in the era of modern physics, laying the foundation for such fields as special relativity and quantum mechanics. Many physicists regard Maxwell as the 19th-century scientist having the greatest influence on 20th-century physics. His contributions to the science are considered by many to be of the same magnitude as those of Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein
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Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (1857 – 1894)

Hertz was a German physicist who first conclusively proved the existence of electromagnetic waves theorized by James Clerk Maxwell's electromagnetic theory of light. Hertz proved the theory by engineering instruments to transmit and receive radio pulses using experimental procedures that ruled out all other known wireless phenomena. The unit of frequency – cycle per second – was named the "hertz" in his honor.
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Edward Jenner (1749 – 1823)

Jenner was an English physician and scientist who was the pioneer of smallpox vaccine, the world's first vaccine. He is often called "the father of immunology", and his work is said to have "saved more lives than the work of any other human".
in the field of zoology he was the first person to describe the brood parasitism of the cuckoo.
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Louis Pasteur (1822 – 1895)

Pasteur was a French chemist and microbiologist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and preventions of diseases, and his discoveries have saved countless lives ever since.
He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization.
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Alfred Nobel (1833 – 1896)

Nobel was a Swedish chemist, engineer, innovator, and armaments manufacturer. Nobel invented dynamite and held 350 other patents, including for a gas meter. Nobel also owned Bofors, which he had redirected from its previous role as primarily an iron and steel producer to a major manufacturer of cannon and other armaments.
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John Logie Baird (1888 – 1946)

Baird was a Scottish engineer, innovator, one of the inventors of the mechanical television, demonstrating the first working television system on 26 January 1926, and inventor of both the first publicly demonstrated colour television system, and the first purely electronic colour television picture tube.
In 1928 the Baird Television Development Company achieved the first transatlantic television transmission. Baird's early technological successes and his role in the practical introduction of broadcast television for home entertainment have earned him a prominent place in television's history.
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Rudolf Diesel (1858–1913)

Diesel, German inventor of the Diesel engine. Diesel sought to build an engine which had much greater efficiency. This led him to develop a diesel powered combustion engine.
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Blaise Pascal (1623 – 1662)

Pascal was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Christian philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum.
In 1642, while still a teenager, he started some pioneering work on calculating machines. After three years of effort and 50 prototypes, he built 20 finished machines (called Pascal's calculators and later Pascalines) over the following 10 years, establishing him as one of the first two inventors of the mechanical calculator.
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Joseph Jacquard (1752 – 1834)

Jacquard was a French weaver and merchant. He played an important role in the development of the earliest programmable loom (the "Jacquard loom"), which in turn played an important role in the development of other programmable machines, such as an early version of digital compiler used to develop the modern day computer.
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John von Neumann (1903 – 1957)

Neumann was a Hungarian-American pure and applied mathematician, physicist, inventor, computer scientist, and polymath. He made major contributions to a number of fields, including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics and quantum statistical mechanics), economics (game theory), computing (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics.His mathematical analysis of the structure of self-replication preceded the discovery of the structure of DNA.
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Tim Berners Lee (1955)

Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee, is an English computer scientist, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web. He made a proposal for an information management system in March 1989, and he implemented the first successful communication between a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) client and server via the Internet sometime around mid-November of that same year.
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Louis Daguerre (1787–1851)

Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre was a French artist and photographer, recognized for his invention of the daguerreotype process of photography. He became known as one of the fathers of photography. Though he is most famous for his contributions to photography, he was also an accomplished painter and a developer of the diorama theatre.
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Karl Friedrich Benz (1844 – 1929)

Benz was a German engine designer and automobile engineer. His Benz Patent Motorcar from 1885 is considered the first practical motorcar. He received a patent for the Motorcar on January 29, 1886. Many similar designs were developed around the same time.
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Edwin Drake (1819 – 1880),

Edwin Drake also known as Colonel Drake, was the first American to successfully drill for oil. Modern drilling and refinement of oil into petrol began around middle of Nineteenth Century. It enabled petrol to be used as a fuel in the internal combustion engine.
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Alexander Parkes (1813 – 1890)

Parkes was a metallurgist and inventor from Birmingham, England. He created Parkesine, the first man-made plastic. Parkes demonstrated a plastic which was made from heated cellulose and moulded into a shape.
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Johannes Gutenberg (1398 – 1468)

Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg was a German blacksmith, goldsmith, printer, and publisher who introduced printing to Europe. His introduction of mechanical movable type printing to Europe started the Printing Revolution and is widely regarded as the most important invention of the second millennium, the seminal event which ushered in the modern period of human history.
It played a key role in the development of the Renaissance, Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment, and the scientific revolution and laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses.
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Alexander Fleming (1881 – 1955)

Sir Alexander Fleming was a Scottish biologist, pharmacologist and botanist. His best-known discoveries are the enzyme lysozyme in 1923 and the antibiotic substance benzylpenicillin (Penicillin G) from the mould Penicillium notatum in 1928, for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Howard Florey and Ernst Boris Chain. He wrote many articles on bacteriology, immunology, and chemotherapy.
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Hideo Kodama

Hideo Kodama of Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute made the first published account of a 3D printed solid model in 1981. Kodama is considered as the “father” of 3D printing.
Kodama idea was too far ahead of its time in the 1980s when even 2D printers were expensive and his idea was ignored at least in Japan.
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Charles Babbage (1791 – 1871)

Created first mechanical computer, which proved to be the prototype for future computers. Considered to be the ‘Father of Computers’.
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Cai Lun (AD 50 – 121)

courtesy name Jingzhong (敬仲), was a Han dynasty Chinese eunuch and official. He is traditionally regarded as the inventor of paper and the papermaking process, in forms recognizable in modern times as paper (as opposed to papyrus). Although early forms of paper had existed in China since the 2nd century BC, he was responsible for the first significant improvement and standardization of paper-making by adding essential new materials into its composition.
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Wilhelm Röntgen (1873 – 1975)

Coolidge was an American physicist and engineer, who made major contributions to X-ray machines. He was the director of the General Electric Research Laboratory and a vice-president of the corporation. He was also famous for the development of "ductile tungsten", which is important for the incandescent light bulb.
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Raymond Samuel Tomlinson (1941 – 2016)

Tomlinson was a pioneering American computer programmer who implemented the first email program on the ARPANET system, the precursor to the Internet, in 1971. It was the first system able to send mail between users on different hosts connected to ARPANET. Tomlinson is internationally known and credited as the inventor of the email.
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lundi 18 juillet 2016

Top 10 Patent Holders from 1997 to 2015 (US Patent and Trademark Office)

The following is a list of the top ten recipients of patents issued by The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in the year indicated.
Year List of Organizations
1997 1- 1724 patents to IBM
2- 1381 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
3- 1095 patents to NEC Corporation
4- 1058 patents to Motorola
5- 903 patents to Fujitsu
6- 903 patents to Hitachi, Ltd.
7- 892 patents to Mitsubishi Denki K.K
8- 862 patents to Toshiba
9- 859 patents to Sony Corporation
10- 795 patents to Eastman Kodak Co.
1998 1- 2657 patents to IBM
2- 1928 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
3- 1627 patents to NEC Corporation
4- 1406 patents to Motorola
5- 1316 patents to Sony Corporation
6- 1304 patents to Samsung Electronics
7- 1189 patents to Fujitsu
8- 1170 patents to Toshiba
9- 1124 patents to Eastman Kodak Co.
10- 1094 patents to Hitachi, Ltd.
1999 1- 2756 patents to IBM
2- 1842 patents to NEC Corporation
3- 1795 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
4- 1545 patents to Samsung Electronics
5- 1410 patents to Sony Corporation
6- 1200 patents to Toshiba
7- 1192 patents to Fujitsu
8- 1192 patents to Motorola
9- 1152 patents to Lucent Technologies
10- 1054 patents to Mitsubishi Denki K.K.
2000 1- 2886 patents to IBM
2- 2021 patents to NEC Corporation
3- 1890 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
4- 1441 patents to Samsung Electronics
5- 1411 patents to Lucent Technologies
6- 1385 patents to Sony Corporation
7- 1304 patents to Micron Technology
8- 1232 patents to Toshiba
9- 1196 patents to Motorola
10- 1147 patents to Fujitsu
2001 1- 3411 patents to IBM
2- 1953 patents to NEC Corporation
3- 1877 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
4- 1643 patents to Micron Technology
5- 1450 patents to Samsung Electronics
6- 1440 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
7- 1363 patents to Sony Corporation
8- 1271 patents to Hitachi, Ltd.
9- 1184 patents to Mitsubishi Denki K.K
10- 1166 patents to Fujitsu, headquartered in Tokyo
2002 1- 3288 patents to IBM
2- 1893 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
3- 1833 patents to Micron Technology
4- 1821 patents to NEC Corporation
5- 1601 patents to Hitachi, Ltd.
6- 1544 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
7- 1434 patents to Sony Corporation
8- 1416 patents to General Electric Company
9- 1373 patents to Mitsubishi Denki K.K.
10- 1328 patents to Samsung Electronics
2003 1- 3415 patents to IBM
2- 1992 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
3- 1893 patents to Hitachi, Ltd.
4- 1786 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.
5- 1759 patents to Hewlett-Packard
6- 1707 patents to Micron Technology
7- 1592 patents to Intel Corporation
8- 1353 patents to Royal Philips Electronics
9- 1313 patents to Samsung Electronics Co.
10- 1311 patents to Sony Corporation
2004 1- 3248 patents to IBM
2- 1934 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.
3- 1805 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
4- 1775 patents to Hewlett-Packard
5- 1760 patents to Micron Technology
6- 1604 patents to Samsung Electronics Co.
7- 1601 patents to Intel Corporation
8- 1514 patents to Hitachi, Ltd.
9- 1310 patents to Toshiba Corporation
10- 1305 patents to Sony Corporation
2005 1- 2203 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA
2- 1828 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
3- 1797 patents to Hewlett-Packard, headquartered in Palo Alto, California, USA
4- 1688 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co.,Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
5- 1641 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Daegu, Korea
6- 1561 patents to Micron Technology, headquartered in Boise, Idaho
7- 1549 patents to Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
8- 1271 patents to Hitachi, Ltd., headquartered in Tokyo
9- 1258 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo
10- 1154 patents to Fujitsu Limited, headquartered in Tokyo
2006 1- 3621 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 2451 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Daegu, Korea
3- 2366 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 2229 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
5- 2099 patents to Hewlett-Packard, headquartered in Palo Alto, California
6- 1959 patents to Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
7- 1771 patents to Sony Corporation
8- 1732 patents to Hitachi, Ltd., headquartered in Tokyo
9- 1672 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo
10- 1610 patents to Micron Technology, headquartered in Boise, Idaho, USA
2007 1- 3125 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA
2- 2723 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Daegu, Korea
3- 1983 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 1910 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
5- 1864 patents to Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
6- 1637 patents to Microsoft Corporation
7- 1519 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo
8- 1476 patents to Micron Technology, headquartered in Boise, Idaho
9- 1466 patents to Hewlett-Packard, headquartered in Palo Alto, California
10- 1455 patents to Sony Corporation
2008 1- 4169 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 3502 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Daegu, Korea
3- 2107 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 2026 patents to Microsoft Corporation
5- 1772 patents to Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
6- 1575 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo
7- 1475 patents to Fujitsu Limited, headquartered in Tokyo
8- 1469 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
9- 1461 patents to Sony Corporation
10- 1422 patents to Hewlett-Packard, headquartered in Palo Alto, California
2009 1- 4887 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 3592 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Daegu, Korea
3- 2901 patents to Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington,
4- 2200 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
5- 1759 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
6- 1669 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
7- 1656 patents to Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
8- 1534 patents to Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
9- 1328 patents to SEIKO EPSON CORPORATION
10- 1269 patents to Hewlett-Packard, headquartered in Palo Alto, California
2014 1- 5866 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 4518 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Suwon, Korea
3- 3086 patents to Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington,
4- 2551 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
5- 2443 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
6- 2212 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
7- 2130 patents to Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
8- 1652 patents to Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
9- 1488 patents to LG ELECTRONICS INC., headquartered in Seoul, Korea
10- 1480 patents to Hewlett-Packard, headquartered in Palo Alto, California
2011 1- 6148 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 4968 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Suwon, Korea
3- 2818 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 2533 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
5- 2451 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
6- 2309 patents to Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington,
7- 2265 patents to Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
8- 1525 patents to SEIKO EPSON CORPORATION
9- 1455 patents to Hitachi, Ltd., headquartered in Tokyo
10- 1444 patents to General Electric Company, headquartered in Schenectady, New York
2012 1- 6478 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 5043 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Suwon, Korea
3- 3173 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 3017 patents to Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
5- 2748 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
6- 2610 patents to Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington,
7- 2415 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
8- 1650 patents to General Electric Company, headquartered in Schenectady, New York
9- 1617 patents to LG ELECTRONICS INC., headquartered in Seoul, Korea
10- 1527 patents to Fujitsu Limited, headquartered in Tokyo
2013 1- 6788 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 4652 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Suwon, Korea
3- 3820 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 3073 patents to Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
5- 2659 patents to Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington,
6- 2582 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
7- 2365 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
8- 2103 patents to QUALCOMM INC.
9- 1945 patents to LG ELECTRONICS INC., headquartered in Seoul, Korea
10- 1851 patents to GOOGLE, INC.
2014 1- 7481 patents to IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- 4936 patents to Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Suwon, Korea
3- 4048 patents to Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- 3214 patents to Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
5- 2829 patents to Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington
6- 2586 patents to QUALCOMM INC.
7- 2566 patents to GOOGLE, INC.
8- 2537 patents to Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
9- 2119 patents to LG ELECTRONICS INC., headquartered in Seoul, Korea
10- 2079 patents to Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan
2015 1- IBM, headquartered in Armonk, New York
2- Samsung Electronics Co., headquartered in Suwon, Korea
3- Canon Kabushiki Kaisha, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
4- QUALCOMM INC.
5- GOOGLE, INC.
6- Toshiba Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
7- Sony Corporation, headquartered in Tokyo, Japan
8- LG ELECTRONICS INC., headquartered in Seoul, Korea
9- Intel Corporation, headquartered in Santa Clara, California
10- Microsoft Corporation, headquartered in Redmond, Washington